Below are editions of intaglio fine art prints from carborundum to traditional etchings. All of these prints have each been ink and printed using a press making each one hand-made.

Views of Denny Isle

Mini Series

Through the Darkness

Presentiments

Broken


Views of Denny Isle

In honour to Hokusai 36 views of Mt Fuji, these prints all focus on a small rocky outcrop called Denny Isle, an unoccupied island in the middle river Severn in the UK that can be seen on the horizon. All are carborundum and dry-point prints are personal responses to this every changing landscape.


Mini Series

During the lock-down due to the worldwide pandemic I began series of carborundum mini prints with limited resources, off-cuts of paper, donated ink and simple die-cutting machine in keeping with the ‘make-do’ spirit during these unprecedented times. These abstracted small landscape prints are inspired by walks along the river Severn reflecting on current affairs and the changing seasons since the Covid-19 pandemic began 2020.


Through the Darkness

These are abstract monotype carborundum prints mounted on birch panels. These were especially made for the Into the Light Exhibition. Each is a unique print that explores the materiality of near darkness where the small lines of erased ink symbolises light breaking through.


Presentiments

These dry-point prints are of the lone oak tree that was the last tree felled at Orchard Pools, a local community woodland. Presentiments suggests the predicament trees of future trees such as these becoming ghosts in the landscape and is also a reference to Goya’s Disasters of War to highlight the inherit madness of development strategies in the UK.


Broken

These lithographs are a response to the continued destruction of woodland for development in the UK in an era where the affects of climate change are now being felt questions the current inertia in protecting the woodlands. The UK has less tree coverage than any other European country, where ‘land-take’ for commercial interested means there remains at a mere 3%. Indigenous hawthorns are ubiquitous to the types of trees that grow in these liminal spaces between the warehouses and industrial plants. Such trees are often disregarded, considered expendable by the construction industry where little of what is truly wild is left in the UK and what there is more feral than wild.  These contorted and broken forms relate to how this landscape has become commodify and distorted by economic concerns.


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